Cover of: Study of attrition among enlisted women in the Navy | Vicky D. Sealey Read Online
Share

Study of attrition among enlisted women in the Navy

  • 615 Want to read
  • ·
  • 45 Currently reading

Published by Naval Postgraduate School, Available from National Technical Information Service in Monterey, Calif, Springfield, Va .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • ATTRITION,
  • FEMALES

Book details:

About the Edition

This thesis examines data on the possible reasons for attrition among enlisted women in the Navy. Cross-tabulations are employed to analyze the most prevalent reasons for attrition among women in the Navy across occupations and compared with men. Entry cohorts from fiscal years 1986 through 1990 were used to identify personnel who left the Navy prior to the completion of their obligated service over a 48-month period. The study results indicate that, with the exception of pregnancy and alcohol/drugs, the reasons for early separation are generally the same for men and women across Navy occupations. The study suggests that further research is needed to accurately determine and address the reasons for female attrition from the Navy.

The Physical Object
Paginationix, 63 p. ;
Number of Pages63
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL25311347M
OCLC/WorldCa640487862

Download Study of attrition among enlisted women in the Navy

PDF EPUB FB2 MOBI RTF

  Cross-tabulations are employed to analyze the most prevalent reasons for attrition among women in the Navy across occupations and compared with men. Entry cohorts from fiscal years through were used to identify personnel who left the Navy prior to the completion of their obligated service over a month : Pursuant to a congressional request, GAO examined the comparability of attrition and retention rates for men and women in the military services from fiscal years through , focusing on: (1) attrition rates for men and women in officer and enlisted grades; (2) the primary separation categories for enlisted men and women during their first enlistment term; and (3) retention rates for men. A study examined the effects of two organizational structural elements--gender appropriateness of job assignment and mix of women and men in a work group--upon the attitudes and behavior of Navy women. Effects of being assigned to a traditionally feminine or masculine job were examined and related to attrition, satisfaction, and by: 1. A prospective study examined whether adult premilitary sexual victimization predicted women's military attrition. In a survey of female Navy recruits (N = 2,), 56% reported some form of adult.

Note 1: Women and Nurse Corps officers who were commissioned in the Navy Reserve and were in an active status on 30 September , are exempt from the above listed attrition policy and may remain in an active status, if otherwise qualified, until they become subject to the age restrictions of 10 USC or 10 USC A first of its kind survey -- conducted outside of official U.S. Navy channels -- the survey results will provide senior uniformed and civilian leadership with a snapshot of how sailors, both officer and enlisted, perceive their experience while serving the Navy and the nation. Waivers. About 30 percent of Navy recruits enter the service with some sort of enlistment waiver, such as for drag use, prior arrests or convictions, dependents, or medical problems. Among the waivered group, the highest attrition is found among those with previous disqualification or separation waivers [3], but this 7File Size: KB. in August examined attrition among high quality enlisted personnel. Results in Brief Enlisted Attrition Women generally leave the service at higher rates than men. The overall attrition loss for enlisted women was percent, or percentage points higher than the percent rate for men.

  This book is for the teenager or young adult who is interested in enlisting in the United States Navy. It will walk him or her through the enlistment and recruit training process: making the decision to join the military, talking to recruiters, getting qualified, preparing for and learning what to expect at basic recruit training/5(6). In a prospective study of U.S. Navy recruits (n = 5,), we examined the relationship between childhood exposure to family violence (child physical abuse, child sexual abuse [CSA], and domestic. WOMEN IN THE NAVY * A HALF CENTURY CHRONOLOGY* The following is drawn from Crossed Currents: Navy Women from WWII to Tailhook by Jean Ebbert and . So, attrition has reached 40 percent—what's the big deal? The problem is that attrition imposes a significant cost on both the operational and support elements of the Navy. In this slide, we show some of these costs. For example, suppose the Navy is able to reduce its first-term attrition rate from 40 percent to 30 percent. Also suppose.